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Portsmouth free stuff and guideFacts, Figures & Free stuff!

Getting around

Portsmouth is an easy city to walk around, with plenty of good sea air to clear the head. If your head is already clear enough, there’s a comprehensive bus network around Portsmouth and beyond, as well as five train stations. And if you need getting around to any of our activities, we can arrange transport for you.

Where to go

If you’re looking for cheap pints and loud music, you can’t beat Guildhall Walk. It’s a popular student spot, meaning the nights are cheap and long to accommodate both the tight student budget, and their legendary love of partying. If you don’t mind rubbing elbows with the 18-21 crowd, there are dozens of bars, pubs and clubs around here. For more pubs, Albert Road has more than you could ever need – it’s practically a pub crawl within itself. If one pub here isn’t to the taste of you or the lads, it’s just a case of walking next door and trying again. And if you’re hoping for something more upmarket, or some music to get your blood pumping, Gunwarf Quays is home to both Portsmouth’s cooler bars, as well as the biggest, noisiest clubs.

Portsmouth Players

Portsmouth Football Club (known as Pompey or the Blue Army) have played at Fratton Park since birth. Although they’ve had a successful football career to date, as champions in 1949 and 1950, and FA Cup winners in 1939 and 2008, financial problems have seen them relegated back down to the 4th tier.

Pride of Portsmouth

Portsmouth’s famous offspring are well known (and largely literary – Dickens, Kipling and Conan Doyle). It also was home to a load of more interesting, if less celebrated residents…

William Tucker – born and baptised in Portsmouth, when he was 14 he was convicted of theft, and sentenced to death. Luckily, even in the 18th Century they thought that this was a bit extreme, so they just sent him to Australia for 7 years instead. After zipping back and forth between England and various bits of Australia for a few years, he stole and sold a Māori warrior head – yeah, literally a head – which resulted in him being killed and eaten by Māori years later. It’s the best warning against shoplifting we’ve ever heard.

Pompey Lil – was an early to mid- 20th century prostitute, who, despite having no teeth and a false eye, was apparently a lovely and well spoken woman.

Jonas Hanway – was, amongst other things, the first man in the UK to use an umbrella. Not as interesting as prostitutes and head thieves, but think how damp you’d get if it hadn’t caught on.

What to see

SpinnakerTower
Taller than the London Eye and Blackpool Tower, it’s now the highest building in the country, outside of London. It’s got 350 degree panoramic views stretching out for 23 miles around it, and is Portsmouth’s newest landmark.

Southsea Common
A nice area to head with the boys, a few beers, and a ball, to round off the weekend on a Sunday morning.

Clarence Pier
Another Sunday morning activity, with an arcade and a few fairground rides. No big day out by any means, but a good place to waste a few hours with the lads before heading home.

Hit the Decks

Soaking up culture and history isn’t typical stag do fare, but when the history is as military as Portsmouth’s, it might be worth a look in. Quick march down to the Mary Rose, a ship that’s been around since the Tudor times, or the optimistically named HMS Victory, or check out some of Portsmouth’s other naval history:

Portsmouth Historic Dockyard - Covering 800 years of history, it’ll ruin every other dockyard in England for you.

The Royal Marines Museum - Nothing’s going to sober you up faster on Sunday morning than seeing the history of the Royal Marines, from the Battle of Trafalgar to D-Day to the Falklands.

Spitbank Fort
- Now a hotel and events centre rather than a tourist attraction, it’s not too late to try and convince the bride to change the wedding venue.



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