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If you'd like press information or commentary email Kye on kye@stagweb.co.uk.

As mentioned in

Did you know?

There are on average approximately 265,000 weddings in England, Scotland and Wales each year.

The average number of people
in a stag/hen group is 13.

That’s up to 6,890,000 guests attending stag and hen parties every year!

What’s the Buzz?

Just like any other industry, the stag and hen market goes through all kinds of trends that are often affected by outside market forces. A weaker pound can lead to less groups heading overseas, the uncertainly of Brexit caused a brief hiccough as many young people were initially unsure what Brexit might mean for travel. However after the June 2016 referendum and aftermath had settled, 2017 turned out to be a bumper year for groups heading overseas with more stags than ever heading to mainland Europe.

Special/social events can also shape pre-wedding plans, World Cup years can see an increase in football related activities while movies and TV shows can also create demand (Game of Thrones and The Walking Dead both created demand for themed stag activities). Millennial brides who grew up reading Harry Potter books are now asking for Harry Potter themed weekends.

Stag & Hen Party Statistics

Based on StagWeb.co.uk & GoHen.com statistics 2017.

Stag weekends are bigger and better than ever before, guys are travelling further, doing more and spending less time drinking. Previously activities such as Booze Cruises and Beer Bikes were big winners with stag groups but they’re falling behind in favour of Bubble Football and Paintball.

There’s a few other surprises too, here’s a breakdown of current stag and hen weekends statistics.



Surprise!

Women are more likely to book nude entertainment on their weekend away

Men are more organised (take that Loose Women!) and plan their weekends earlier than hens

Stags are twice as likely to travel overseas (46% of stags head abroad)



Stag & Hen Destinations:
Oh we don’t like to be beside the seaside...

Traditional seaside resorts are being ditched in favour of big cities.

UK Stags

  1. Bristol
  2. Liverpool
  3. Bournemouth
  4. Newcastle
  5. Cardiff
  6. Birmingham
  7. Manchester
  8. Bath
  9. Brighton
  10. London

UK Hens

  1. Bath
  2. Liverpool
  3. London
  4. Bristol
  5. Manchester
  6. Birmingham
  7. Cheltenham
  8. Cardiff
  9. Bournemouth
  10. Cambridge

Hens are far more likely to choose sunny/beach destinations.

International Stags

  1. Berlin
  2. Hamburg
  3. Barcelona
  4. Dublin
  5. Prague
  6. Budapest
  7. Lisbon
  8. Amsterdam
  9. Krakow
  10. Benidorm

International Hens

  1. Barcelona
  2. Marbella
  3. Dublin
  4. Amsterdam
  5. Benidorm
  6. Algarve
  7. Valencia
  8. Madrid
  9. Ibiza
  10. Budapest

Stags are twice as likely to travel overseas.

Stags: 46% / Hens: 20%

Stag country stats

stag stats

Hen country stats

hen stats

Most Popular Activities

Stags

  1. Bubble Football
  2. Paintball
  3. Go Karting
  4. Quad Biking
  5. Escape Game
  6. Clay Shooting
  7. Beer Bike
  8. Mud Buggies
  9. Target Shooting
  10. Footgolf

Hens

  1. Cocktail Making
  2. Afternoon Tea
  3. Butler in the Buff
  4. Life Drawing
  5. Escape Games
  6. Thermae Spa
  7. Inflatable Games
  8. Bubble Mayhen
  9. Spa & Treatment
  10. Beyoncé Dance Class

Money Money Money

Just like weddings, pre-wedding party budgets vary wildly.

Stags average spend.

Stags spend

Hens average spend.

Hens spend



BFFS

Brides and grooms take the same number of friends with them.

Average Group Size

Stags: 13 / Hens: 13

Organisation

There are other myths that can be busted too. Men are more organised than their bridal counterparts with stag parties organising things earlier than the hens.

When Do Groups Book Their Weekends?

Stags: 134 days before the weekend

Hens: 126 days before the weekend

Bear Grylls featured in Sunday TimesHistory of the stag party

Some sources allude to stag parties going back to Viking times when Viking Eric Bloodaxe, between raiding Scotland and ruling Northumbria, would gather his Viking mates, raise a little hell and thereafter solicit the favours of agreeable Viking womenfolk. We can neither confirm or deny that these same women may have been prepared to remove their ‘clothing’ for the appropriate sum (a boars head).

Looking however at the more reliable sources, it's suggested that stag dos first came about around the fifth century in Sparta, when military comrades would enthusiastically feast and toast one another on the eve of a friend's wedding. Much like the modern stag do they would say bid ‘αντίο’ to the carefree days of bachelorhood and swear continued allegiance to his comrades (and presumably his fiancée). As to the actual word ‘bachelor’, the history isn't totally clear; the earliest meaning in English of bachelor referenced in the late thirteenth century is ‘a young knight who followed the banner of another’. Chaucer also talked of a ‘bachelor’ in the late fourteenth century and meant it to mean ‘an unmarried man’. The English word apparently comes from Old French and most Old French apparently comes from Latin so it might possibly have meant ‘farmhand’ at one point but we're not too sure about that one!

StagWeb featured at Twickenham Stadium

If you look closely we've been mentioned at the home of Rugby, Twickenham stadium. Our @StagWeb Twitter account is featured on the tunnel wall giving the England Rugby team some inspiration before a game!

If you can't quite make it out, it says: "@StagWeb - There's no time like today to become legends!"

See StagWeb on US Television Show - The Doctors

Here's just some of the places we've been featured

Stag's around the world

What they call them abroad!

For all you stags heading abroad for your stag do's - here's a quick stag-do-name guide so you can explain your behaviour to the locals:

  • Australia - bucks party / bucks night
  • Canada - bachelor party
  • France - enterrement de vie de garçon
  • Germany - junggesellenabschied
  • Ireland - stag do
  • Italy - addio al celibato
  • South Africa - bull's party / bull's night
  • Spain - despedida de soltero
  • Greece - μπάτσελορ πάρτι
  • Bulgaria - ергенско парти
  • Finland - polttarit
  • UK - stag do
  • USA - bachelor party

While the UK and Ireland arguably set the standard, they’re now closely followed by the USA, and approach stag dos as significant life milestones. However, whilst a traditional celebration in many cultures, it’s not just us that commit to a celebratory weekend and variations on a theme do occur. For instance, to the horror of many a best man (and groom and possibly bride), in the USA they often hold Stag-and-Doe parties so the Bride and Groom can party together (in the UK we call this a Hag Do). In Germany they call a stag do a “Junggesellenabschied”, which they enjoy before the “Polterabend”, a pre-wedding party where pots and earthenwear are smashed on the floor. The amorous French are slightly more moribund when it comes to getting spliced and appear to see the stag celebration as a kind of Passover, subsequently calling their stag parties ‘enterrement de vie de garçon’, which literally means "(the) burial of the life as a boy" or "burial/funeral of the life as a bachelor".

In Hungary Hungarian peasants host a formal stag party during which the groom is offered to his future wife wearing only a special black apron and embroidered shirt to signify betrothal. The groom then wears these garments on a walk to show off the look to the admiring neighbourhood. Traditional Armenian men have it best of all though we reckon, a man would send his chosen bride some new clothes (instead of an expensive ring) and then she’d send him food. No forking out for a ring and a hearty slap up meal, what a winner. Serbia is another unusual one, to celebrate (apparently without the groom actually being present) the groom’s dad fills a flask with his best brandy, decorates it with shrubbery, chucks it over his shoulder and sets off to invite the guests - every person he invites gets a swig of brandy and then tops it up with their own and we’d bet they’re all too smashed to make it to the church. Transylvania top the morbid list as they tend to think of marriage as a sort of metaphorical death and play funeral dirges with the grooms friends singing horrific songs about the dead departing the world. Cheery.

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